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Colorado CollegeBulletin | December 2006

About the Cover

Grow your own thesis:

CC students, some funded by venture grants, conducted research at historic Venetucci Farm just south of Colorado Springs. (Read the story.) Other venture grants funded independent student research into religion and ritual in Japan, post-forest-fire nest siting by flammulated owls, a fair-trade cooperative in Nicaragua, and anti-Mafia efforts in Sicily. Photo by Tom Kimmell.


Letters

Dear Editor,

The Bulletin does a great job of tackling new and interesting subjects — especially as they relate to the college’s place in our world. I love the “Bookshelf” column for its additions to my personal bookshelf. I have also enjoyed reading about what other alums and students are doing. The Bulletin is a tangible means of positively reinforcing all that I learned and continue to learn as a result of my connection to this incredible institution. Keep it coming!

Abbay Robinson Milnor ’96

Dear Editor,

In response to “The Class of ’68 Turns 60” (July 2006 Bulletin, p.14), I can’t say that I disagree with much the six members of the class of 1968 have to say. The late ’60s and early ’70s were ripe for our protests and what we saw as important for not only our generation but also future ones. I think we did manage to make the country notice and force change to things that needed to change — environment, civil rights, gender equality.

I think it might be a bit unfair to say that “based on the performance of the politicians of our generation, I’d say we blew it.” In many ways we accomplished a lot and I often feel that I am still fighting to make sure the clock is not turned back. 

In response to “Why don’t we have better leadership in Washington?” I would venture a guess that many of us ’60s protesters who might have thought about becoming political “leaders” made the decision not to “expose” our skeletons in the closets by running for public office. Why would we put ourselves through the ordeal of some reporter unearthing a wild, revolutionary youth and then have to respond to whatever is unearthed?

I believe that by working the system from the outside I have managed to accomplish quite a bit to ensure that future generations have a clean and green environment. And if this group of six from 1968 is representative of that class, they have too.

Jesse Sokolow ’72