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For Immediate Release

Media contacts:
Jane Turnis
(719) 389-6138
JTurnis@ColoradoCollege.edu

Leslie Weddell
(719) 389-6038
Leslie.Weddell@ColoradoCollege.edu                                                      

                                                      
COLORADO COLLEGE SYMPOSIUM ASKS,
'RELIGION & PUBLIC LIFE: WHY BE AFRAID?'

Diverse group of politicians, religious leaders, scientists, journalists explore issue

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Oct. 5, 2006 – A presidential election in which conservative religious voters showed their might. Court cases scrutinizing the teaching of evolution and prayer in schools. A national debate on gay marriage and a federal amendment banning it. Faith-based social programs. A president who seeks counsel regularly from the head of an evangelical organization.

Religion has always been a part of American political life, but in recent years, it has become more evident. Some say we have separation of church and state – but a “diminishing divide” between religion and politics, religion and public life.

To explore this issue, Colorado College will present a four-day symposium, “Religion and Public Life: Why Be Afraid?” Oct. 18-21 on the CC campus. The series of speakers includes past presidential candidate Gary Hart, who wrote “God and Caesar in America: An Essay on Religion and Politics,” Jim Wallis, author of “God’s Politics: Why the Right Gets it Wrong and the Left Doesn’t Get It,” Ted Haggard, president of the National Association of Evangelicals, senior pastor of New Life Church and religious advisor to President George W. Bush; Suzanne Holland, author of “Beyond Cloning” and co-editor for “The Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debates: Science, Ethics and Public Policy.”

The symposium will feature 18 speakers – scholars, politicians and political advisors, artists, scientists, religious leaders and journalists from differing perspectives to engage in the topic. Panels and discussions will provide opportunities to consider, discuss and debate the various ways that religion and our public life intersect and influence one another.
The topics they will address include: religious leaders advising presidents; issues in science; religion in a democratic society; the role of religion in struggles for expansion of democracy; and religion in a consumer culture.  The symposium will conclude with a performance by female Muslim stand-up comic Tissa Hami.

“It’s hard to imagine a topic that engenders more passion for U.S. citizens than religion and public life,” said Bruce Coriell, Colorado College chaplain. “That’s why Colorado College is the perfect place to ask the question. CC is dedicated to the life of the mind and committed to be a hospitable place for people of all faiths or no faith. We look forward to a lively and substantive discussion.”

Colorado College hosts symposia approximately every other year to offer students, faculty, staff and the community a unique intellectual adventure through an engaging exchange of views.

Schedule of events

Wednesday, October 18
Lecture: Michael Brooks: "If We Want to Have a Good Fight, We Need a Ring" — Brooks, director of Hillel at University of Michigan, presents "If We Want to Have a Good Fight, We Need a Ring." A question-and-answer discussion period of approximately 45 minutes will follow. This is the first event in the CC Symposium on Religion and Public Life: Why Be Afraid?, running Oct. 18-21. For the full schedule, visit www.coloradocollege.edu/news_events/religion.asp. Sponsored by Colorado College, with support from the Greenberg Center for Learning and Tolerance.
11 a.m., Colorado College, Packard Hall, 5 W. Cache La Poudre St., free

Wednesday, October 18
Panel: Ted Haggard and Phil Wogaman: "Advising Presidents: Role of Religious Leaders in Politics" — Haggard is religious advisor to President George W. Bush, president of the National Association of Evangelicals, and the senior pastor of New Life Church in Colorado Springs. Wogaman was religious advisor to former President Bill Clinton, and is past president of the Interfaith Alliance and former senior pastor of Foundry United Methodist Church in Washington, D.C. Part of the CC Symposium on Religion and Public Life: Why Be Afraid?, running Oct. 18-21. For the full schedule, visit www.coloradocollege.edu/news_events/religion.asp. Sponsored by Colorado College.
3:30 p.m., Colorado College, Shove Memorial Chapel, 1010 N. Nevada Ave., free

Wednesday, October 18
Lecture: Jim Wallis: "God's Politics: Why the Right Gets It Wrong and the Left Doesn't Get It" — Wallis, author of the book by the same title, will present the Daniel Patrick O'Connor Memorial Lecture. Part of the CC Symposium on Religion and Public Life: Why Be Afraid?, running Oct. 18-21. For the full schedule, visit www.coloradocollege.edu/news_events/religion.asp. Sponsored by the Daniel Patrick O'Connor Memorial Lecture Endowed Fund and Colorado College.
7:30 p.m., Colorado College, Shove Memorial Chapel, 1010 N. Nevada Ave., free

Thursday, October 19
Panel: Suzanne Holland, Jane Lubchenco and Laurie Zoloth: "Issues in Science" — Tass Kelso, CC professor of biology, will moderate this bag lunch and panel discussion. Panelists include Suzanne Holland, author of "Beyond Cloning," co-editor for "The Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debates: Science, Ethics and Public Policy" and associate professor of religious and social ethics and chair of the department of religious studies at the University of Puget Sound; Jane Lubchenco (CC '69), the Wayne and Gladys Valley Professor of Marine Biology and Distinguished Professor of Zoology at Oregon State University; and Laurie Zoloth, professor of Medical Humanities and Bioethics at Northwestern's Feinberg School of Medicine and professor of religion and member of the Jewish Studies faculty at Northwestern University. Part of the CC Symposium on Religion and Public Life: Why Be Afraid?, running Oct. 18-21. For the full schedule, visit www.coloradocollege.edu/news_events/religion.asp. Sponsored by Colorado College with support from the Office of the Dean of the College and the faculty of Colorado College.
Noon, Colorado College, Bemis Hall, 920 N. Cascade Ave. (west of Cutler Hall), free

Thursday, October 19
Panel: Linell Cady and Amy Sullivan: "Public Interest and Private Lives: Religion's Place in America Today" — Panelists are Linell Cady, director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict and professor of modern Western religious thought at Arizona State University, and Amy Sullivan, an opinion journalist and former editor of Washington Monthly. Each panelist will present, then respond to each other's remarks, and the audience will then have the opportunity to ask questions. Part of the CC Symposium on Religion and Public Life: Why Be Afraid?, running Oct. 18-21. For the full schedule, visit www.coloradocollege.edu/news_events/religion.asp. Sponsored by Colorado College.
3:30 p.m., Colorado College, Gaylord Hall, main floor of Worner Campus Center, 902 N. Cascade Ave., free

Thursday, October 19
Lecture: Gary Hart, past presidential candidate and author of "God and Caesar in America: An Essay on Religion and Politics,"  will present the symposium's keynote address. Overflow seating with a video stream of the lecture will be provided in Gates Common Room, located on the third floor of Palmer Hall, 1025 N. Cascade Ave. Part of the CC Symposium on Religion and Public Life: Why Be Afraid?, running Oct. 18-21. For the full schedule, visit www.coloradocollege.edu/news_events/religion.asp . Sponsored by Colorado College.
7:30 p.m., Colorado College, Shove Memorial Chapel, 1010 N. Nevada Ave., free

Friday, October 20
Lecture: Robert Bellah: "The Place of Religion in a Democratic Society" — Bellah is the Elliot Professor of Sociology, emeritus, University of California at Berkeley, author and editor of "Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life," and author of "The Broken Covenant: American Civil Religion in Time of Trial" and "Beyond Belief: Essays on Religion in a Post-Traditional World."  CC seniors Kate Storms, a political science major, and Kathleen Denny, a sociology major, will deliver responses. The audience will then have an opportunity to ask questions. Part of the CC Symposium on Religion and Public Life: Why Be Afraid?, running Oct. 18-21. For the full schedule, visit www.coloradocollege.edu/news_events/religion.asp. Sponsored by the McHugh Family Distinguished Chair in American Institutions and Leadership and Colorado College.
1 p.m., Colorado College, Gates Common Room, third floor of Palmer Hall, 1025 N. Cascade Ave. (east of Tutt Library), free

Friday, October 20
Panel: George 'Tink' Tinker and Liyakat Takim: "The Religious Other in America" — George "Tink" Tinker, professor of American Indian cultures and religious traditions at Iliff School of Theology in Denver and Liyakat Takim, a Tanzanian native who teaches courses on Islam in the University of Denver's Department of Religious Studies, will participate in a panel presentation, followed by a discussion. Part of the CC Symposium on Religion and Public Life: Why Be Afraid?, running Oct. 18-21. For the full schedule, visit www.coloradocollege.edu/news_events/religion.asp. Sponsored by Colorado College.
3:30 p.m., Colorado College, Gaylord Hall, main floor of Worner Campus Center, 902 N. Cascade Ave., free

Friday, October 20
Panel: Vincent Harding, Sulak Sivaraksa and Amber Tafoya: "The Role of Religion in Struggles for Expansion of Democracy" — Panelists are Vincent Harding, former speechwriter for Dr. Martin Luther King, professor emeritus of religion and human transformation at the Iliff School of Theology and chairperson of the Veterans of Hope Project, both in Denver; Sulak Sivaraksa, founder of the International Network of Engaged Buddhists and 1995 recipient of the Alternative Nobel Prize (the Right Livelihood Award); and Amber Tafoya, supervising attorney for the Center for Immigrant and Community Integration Legal Services Office of the Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Pueblo. Part of the CC Symposium on Religion and Public Life: Why Be Afraid?, running Oct. 18-21. For the full schedule, visit www.coloradocollege.edu/news_events/religion.asp. Sponsored by the Paul Sheffer Memorial Fund and Colorado College. Sulak Sivaraksa's visit is sponsored in conjunction with Naropa University.
7:30 p.m., Colorado College, Shove Memorial Chapel, 1010 N. Nevada Ave., free

Saturday, October 21
Lecture: Vincent Miller: "Religion and Public Life in an Age of the iPods, Cell Phones and Blogs: Reasons for Fear and Hope" — Miller is associate professor and Catholic theologian at Georgetown University and author of "Consuming Religion: Christian Faith and Practice in a Consumer Culture." A question-and-answer session will follow the lecture. Part of the CC Symposium on Religion and Public Life: Why Be Afraid?, running Oct. 18-21. For the full schedule, visit www.coloradocollege.edu/news_events/religion.asp. Sponsored by the Paul Sheffer Memorial Fund and Colorado College.
2 p.m., Colorado College, Gaylord Hall, main floor of Worner Campus Center, 902 N. Cascade Ave., free

Saturday, October 21
Performance: Comedian Tissa Hami — CC's Symposium on Religion and Public Life: Why Be Afraid? concludes with a performance by Muslim comedian Tissa Hami. The Boston Globe Sunday Magazine calls her "sassy, sexual, sarcastic ... she spins laughter out of anger, turning Islamic stereotypes inside out." Free, but tickets are required. Tickets available at the Worner Campus Center  beginning Oct. 9. The symposium runs Oct. 18-21. For the full schedule, visit www.coloradocollege.edu/news_events/religion.asp. Sponsored by Colorado College Great Performers and Ideas.
7:30 p.m., Colorado College, Shove Memorial Chapel, 1010 N. Nevada Ave., free; tickets at Worner Campus Center, 902 N. Cascade Ave.

For information, directions or disability accommodation at the events, members of the public may call (719) 389-6607.

About Colorado College
Colorado College is a nationally prominent, four-year liberal arts and sciences college that was founded in Colorado Springs in 1874. The college operates on the innovative Block Plan, in which its 1,945 students study one course at a time in intensive 3½-week blocks. For more information, visit www.ColoradoCollege.edu <http://www.ColoradoCollege.edu>.

Note to Editors: Photographs of many of the symposium speakers are available upon request.